3D Printing is Finally Changing the Manufacturing Landscape

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3D Printing is Finally Changing the Manufacturing Landscape

The right software can change industries quickly.

For fast-moving companies like Airbnb, Stripe, Uber, Facebook, or Slack, the piping such as the internet and smartphones is already well-established, allowing these startups to scale at unprecedented speeds.

For 3D printing and other such hard technologies? Things end up being a lot more complicated.

The rise of 3D printing reached peak hype years ago and as far back as 2014, we were illustrating how 3D printing could ultimatelyshape the futureof business. However, since those days, the technology has arguably fallen into the dreaded trough of disillusionment category on the famous Gartner Hype Cycle.

The harsh reality is that its just really hard to move things like 3D printing forward at the same type of speed as software. For the technology to scale at a commercial level, products would need to be flawless and intuitive from the get-go (they werent), and all engineering, technological, and design problems would need to be solved at lightning-quick speeds. Instead, it takes huge amounts of research, investment, patience, and iterations to get to the next level.

Todays infographic comes to us fromRaconteur, and it highlights a most recent snapshot of the 3D printing industry. Importantly, it shows that the technology is still chugging along in a way that is changing how things are made just at a less hype-worthy pace.

3D printing has now permeated practically every industry in at least some capacity, being used in a wide range of sectors from consumer goods to pharmaceuticals.

According to areportby EY, the potential for additive manufacturing is highest in the automotive and aerospace industries. For example, its expected that about half (49%) of automotive companies will use 3D printing to directly manufacture car parts in order to achieve operational efficiencies. These companies believe that 3D printing will help them address challenges such as demand for increased customization, continued improvement, and lightweight components.

As a result of increased demand and more familiarity with the technology, Gartner said shipments of 3D printers increased 108% between 2015 and 2016, resulting in 456,000 units shipped globally. More importantly, by 2020 this number will be at 6.7 million units, which would represent phenomenal growth for the technology.

As of today, most companies are still using 3D printers for accelerating product development, such as prototyping (34% of applications) and for proof of concept (23%). However, as 3D printing gets more use in additional areas such as mass customization and collaboration on products its possible the ship will really begin to sail, even if it was slightly delayed in getting out of the gate.

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Easy 3D Printing Comes to Staples

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Easy 3D Printing Comes to Staples

img src= alt= width=95 height=123 /Although the technology has taken off in recent years, the fact remains that 3D printing is still largely unavailable to the public. But due to a new partnership between office supply giant, Staples and 3D printer manufacturer, Mcor, that may begin to change.

As often as we talk about additive manufacturing here atDigitalManufacturingReport, you might think that the service is available everywhere from manufacturing plants to convenience stores.

Although the technology has taken off in recent years, the fact remains that 3D printing is still largely unavailable to the public.

But due to a new partnership between office supply giant, Staples and 3D printer manufacturer, Mcor, that may begin to change.

3D printers in the home may still be a long ways off. Until that time, consumers will look to service bureaus, said Mcor Technologies co-founder and CEO Dr. Conor MacCormack.

Using Mcors IRIS printer, Staples customers can, in early 2013, upload their designs to the Staples website, then pick up their printed models at their local Staples, or simply have it shipped to their homes.

The IRIS touts the highest color capability and lowest operating cost of commercial-class 3D printers, making it the ideal machine for the job. Unlike other systems, the IRIS uses ordinary A4 letter sized paper as a build material, which is ideal for most consumers.

Wouter Van Dijk, president of the Staples Printing Systems Division in Europe expects customers with all sorts of designs from prototypes to art projects will soon take advantage of Stapes new service.

Printing at 506dpi, the IRIS will also be ideal for architectural designs, maps, medical models, and even replica weapons. However, with a height maximum of six inches, not every design will be appropriate for the Staples Easy 3D service.

Following the announcement of Easy 3D at the Euromold 2012 conference, Staples stated that the service will eventually be offered in other countries, but has not specified when it might arrive in the US. Belgium and the Netherlands are the first European countries where theplatformwill be available.

Regardless of its entry into American stores, this is now the broadest adoption of retail 3D printing to date.

Unfortunately, this release comes just after the holiday season, so design enthusiasts may have to wait another year before they see personalized IRIS-printed models under the tree.

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The 7 weirdest things made by 3D printing

The 7 weirdest things made by 3D printing

Brooklyn-based MakerBot Industries makes personal 3D printers. The machines lay down thin layers of plastic through a funnel until a 3D object is fully formed. Objects vary from small toys to remote-controlled cars.

The cost of 3D printing has long kept the technology in a select few hands, but all that is changing as 3D printing blossoms into a full-fledged trend.

This June, Staples will start retailing aconsumer 3D printer,the Cube 3D Printer, for $1,299 — not cheap, but not out of reach of the dedicated techie, either. Proponents hope that as costs come down, more sophisticated printers will reach the general public, allowing for digital DIY manufacturing.

Though copyright and quality issues remain a concern,3D printinghas already made its mark in some pretty weird ways. Read on for seven strange objects created by 3D printers.

It looks more like a toy than a deadly weapon, but the worlds first3D-printedgun has gun control advocates as well as pro-gun rights enthusiasts concerned and excited. Last year, Cody Wilson, a radical libertarian/anarchist from the University of Texas law school, announced plans for printing a gun, establishing a nonprofit called Defense Distributed to fabricate the weapon and distribute the plans.

In early March, Wilson and his team achieved their dream, successfully testing the Liberator on a Texas firing range. Except for a firing pin made from a metal nail, the gun is made from plastic pieces printed on an $8,000 Stratasys Dimension SST 3D printer. The gun successfully shot a .380 caliber bullet, but exploded when its creators tried to modify it to shoot a larger 5.7×28 rifle cartridge.

The worlds first 3D-printed violin is half technological wonder, half papier-mach project. DIY violin-maker Alex Davies used 3D printing to make a plastic form for the violins body, which he and his team then covered in newspaper and glue. A piece of cardboard made the neck and some picture-hanging wire served for strings. The result, announced online Feb. 27 via asomewhat-difficult-to-listen-to YouTube video, was no Stradivarius, but its creators declared it not bad for a weekend and 12 dollars.

After discovering the skeleton of long-lost King Richard III under a parking lot in Leicester, England, archaeologists turned over the skull measurements to facial reconstruction expert Caroline Wilkinson of the University of Dundee. Wilkinson and her colleagues sculpted computerized flesh to computerized bone and then3D printed the resulting bust– a lifelike look at a man dead more than 500 years.

Dont expect to see this in Staples anytime soon, but scientists have developed a

The device works by creating uniform droplets of living embryonic stem cells, which are the cells present in early development that are capable of differentiating into any type of tissue. The printer is so gentle that it can squirt out as few as five cells at a time without damaging them. Researchers can use the dabs of cells to rapidly test drugs or to build miniature scraps of tissue. The eventual goal is to grow whole organs from scratch.

3D-printed organs may be a dream for the future, but scientists can already build some body parts. In March, surgeons replaced 75 percent of a mans skull with a plastic one made by 3D printing.

Replacing damaged or diseased bone is not new, but the OsteoFab implant is the first to be custom manufactured via 3D printing — an advance that helps bring down the cost. Oxford Performance Materials, the company that created the implant, plans to work on other biocompatible implants for the rest of the body.

Did you hear that? Probably, if youre wearing a3D-printed earcreated by Princeton University researchers. The bionic ear, made from calf cells, a polymer gel and silver nanoparticles, can pick up radio signals beyond the range of human hearing.

To make the ear, the researchers printed the gel into an approximate ear shape and cultured the calf cells on that matrix to create something appropriately biological. An infusion of silver nanoparticles creates an antenna for picking up those radio signals, which could then be transferred to the cochlea, the part of the ear that translates sound into brain signals. However, the researchers have no plans to stick the ear to a human head. Yet.

Cant wait to see what your baby will look like? Japanese company Fasotec has you covered. The engineering firm can take magnetic resonance images (MRI) of adeveloping fetus in the womband convert them into a 3D-printed paperweight of your fetus in white plastic, surrounded by a clear plastic tummy.

Fasotecs main gig is creating 3D prints of scanned organs for doctors and medical students, so fetus keepsakes are something of a promotional sideline. Japanese moms can get theirs for about 100,000 yen (approximately $975), not including the cost of the MRI.

Follow Stephanie Pappas onTwitterandGoogle+. Follow +. Original article onLiveScience.com.

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Staples Offering 3D Printing Services in US

For almost a year now, Staples has been onboard the 3D printing movement, supplying 3D printers to its customers. The European Staples branches have also offered 3D printing services to customers for about as long. Now, Staples is expanding, by offering the 3D printing experience to customers in the US as well.

Two Staples locations one in New York and the other in Los Angeles- have begun to offer 3D printing services. If the pilot program generates enough interest, Staples plans to expand their 3D printing services and offer it in more locations.

Staples is not alone in offering 3D printing services; Shapeways allows customers to print their own designs on its machines, and 3D Systems has offered 3D printing services since 2010. (Read more)

This entry was posted in3D PrintingCustomizationDesignDevelopmentInnovationServicesTechnologyUncategorizedand tagged3d servicesCustomersLos Angelesnew yorkStaplerUS. Bookmark thepermalink.

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(3D Printing Industry) Taiwanese-based XYZprinting is partnering with Staples, the office supply chain, to feature XYZprintings products for sale…View Article

(BusinessWire) Staples has announced a new online 3D-printing platform that will let small businesses and consumers upload their 3D…View Article

(3D Printing Industry) Staples sells 3D printers and 3D-printing supplies in-store and online. Importantly, while Staples offers multiple 2D-printer…View Article

(3D Printing Industry) Staples is expanding its European presence for 3D printing by bringing a variety of desktop 3D…View Article

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(Market Watch) Changing Technologies is an emerging technology company focused on developing innovative concepts to bring to consumers. It recently…View Article

The store will incorporate the T-Element to its copy center: anyone with a design on-file will have the ability to 3D print their creations.

Staples has opened two experimental 3D printing service centers in New York and Los Angeles after two years of European trials.

The office-supply retailer began offering 3D printing services in two stores last week, one in New York and another in Los Angeles.

Staples myeasy3D is available online via the Staples Office Center, allowing consumers, architects, educators, students, product designers and healthcare professionals low-cost, durable, colorful, photorealistic 3D printed products from Staples stores.

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